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The Silk Route - World Travel: Jaisalmer, Jodhpur, India
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India: Jaisalmer
February 2009

Jaisalmer Jaisalmer Fort The Palace Walkabout in Jaisalmer The Jain Temples
Havelis - Private Mansions Gadi Sagar Tank Camel Trek in the Sam Dunes of the Great Thar Desert
India: Jaisalmer

 

Jaisalmer, our favourite city of the trip to India in 2009. A wonderful walled centuries-old fort city in the middle of the great Thar Desert.

Jaisalmer

camels
Camel carts, early morning.

 

Leaving Bikaner early for the five hour drive to Jaisalmer, we got lost in the back streets of the city. The locals were very helpful in getting us back on our way. It was no fault of the driver - suddenly the road disappeared into roadworks with no signs whatsoever to help anyone on their way.

The landscape very soon became rubbly desert with low trees and scrub, and then a sandy desert with very low vegetation which sometimes became quite green again and in at least one spot crops were growing near modern-style windmills.

Goods transport is predominantly by camel cart, at least for relatively small loads.

jaisalmer

 

Scenes on the road: half a dozen peacocks in a low tree, children playing on a dirt heap, one young girl pretending to play a broken stringed instrument, big smiles, thatched cottages near Jaisalmer.

We stopped for a quick lunch of chicken naan and beer at Pokaram and arrived in Jaisalmer around 2pm. Outside the city there are even more wind farms and we learned later from our guide that they have been here for about four and a half years. The city uses only 20% of the generated power and exports the rest.

I can do no better than the Lonely Planet description of the city: "Jaisalmer is a breathtaking sight. A magical, multi-turreted sand castle on the 80m-high Trikuta (Three-Peaked) Hill rises mirage-like from the horizontal desert plain. ... No place better evokes ancient desert splendour and exotic trade routes".

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer Killa Bhawan
View from our balcony.

 

Our TransIndus rep was there to meet us just outside the city wall as no cars are allowed inside, and took us by tuk-tuk to our hotel. It was a short, very exhilarating ride through the narrow streets.

Jaisalmer Killa Bhawan
Hotel Killa Bhawan (our room balcony on the second from left bastion).
Jaisalmer Killa Bhawan
Our room.

We were made to feel very welcome by the owner of our small hotel, the Killa Bhawan, who showed us through the wonderful labyrinth of rooms and stairs to our room.

Jaisalmer Killa Bhawan
Hotel Killa Bhawan
Jaisalmer Killa Bhawan

The hotel is built within the ramparts of the fort and we had the best room in the hotel with the best view in the city! It was a really wonderful room, with beautiful statues in niches and a little balcony with a fantastic view. The large four poster bed faced the balcony, and the bathroom had everything you could want.

The owner had bought the first part of his hotel many years ago and gradually expanded, renovating more and more and extending around the wall. He said he had promised himself at the start he would one day incorporate the room in which we were staying and his dream had come true. We loved it.

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Andrew on our balcony ...

The hotel has numerous terraces, the roof top terrace where breakfast and dinner can be served, though you could eat on any of the terraces if you wished, plus lots of other small terraces with comfortable cushioned seating, tables and chairs.

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... and me!

Tea is on permanent offer and everyone was so helpful, it was a wonderful place to stay.

We learned after we booked the hotel that there is an issue of draining water wearing away the foundations of the fort so tourists are asked to use water sparingly.

The drainage system of the fort is actually undergoing renovation so perhaps this won't be a problem in future.

Jaisalmer

 

Jaisalmer Fort

Jaisalmer

Said to be the oldest continually occupied fort in the world, today a quarter of the population of Jaisalmer still live inside the fort. Originally everyone lived inside, protected by the massive stone walls, but in more peaceful times, as the population expanded, so they moved outside the walls.

The fort is actually a defensive town, built within walls studded with 99 bastions. The entrance through Surya Pol (Sun Gate) is protected by three concentric walls, from the innermost of which the defenders of the town would throw boiling oil and massive rounded boulders onto invaders. The Golden City is made from glowing sandstone and is a beautiful place of havelis, temples and a palace.

Jaisalmer Fort
The main gate into the fort.

Founded in 1156 by Rawal Jaisal of the Bhattis, as a better defensive site than his original city of Loduvra, all of the inhabitants would have worked in one capacity or another for the Maharaja. The following centuries were a time of constant warfare. One Muslim blockade of the city lasted many years and when defeat was imminent the women of the city committed ritual mass suicide and their menfolk rode out to certain death.

Relations with the Mughals were not always poor and were often improved by strategic marriages.

Jaisalmer became prosperous in the seventeenth century due to its location on the caravan trade routes between India and Asia. The rich merchants built themselves beautiful havelis - the most exquisite in Rajasthan according to the Lonely Planet Guide. The decline in wealth was heralded by the opening up of sea trade routes and partition cut the major land routes, fatally damaging Jaisalmer's traditional source of enrichment. Today, however, Jaisalmer is of strategic importance, lying close to the Pakistan border.

Jaisalmer

 

The Palace

Jaisalmer

 

Within the Fort is a warren of streets. Through the main gates the road zig-zags as a defensive measure, and leads to a large courtyard, dominated by a tall palace. This sixteenth century palace was once the home of a succession of Maharajas but now houses a museum.

Jaisalmer
The Maharaja's Palace
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Maharaja's Palace
Jaisalmer

 

 

It is quite small compared to  other palaces we have seen, and without the  ornate interiors, but the pierced sandstone work of the balconies is beautiful - as delicate as lace.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
A finely carved building inside the fort.

 

To the left of the palace is a flight of steps leading to a platform with a dazzling white marble throne (now protected by an iron cage). This was where the Maharajah (also called Maharawal) would make important public announcements or view entertainment.

Jaisalmer
A Jain Temple inside the fort.

On the wall by the entrance to the palace are a number of red handmarks which commemorate the ritual suicide or sati of women of the fort.

 

 

A small Jain Temple had a beautiful line of musicians carved along the roof.

Jaisalmer

 

Walkabout in Jaisalmer

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

 

In the early evening of the day we arrived our guide took us for a long walk around the city. He knew it intimately, living there himself with his family. One aspect which didn't bother him at all, but at some points almost made me ill, was the smell. The streets are almost all flanked by open sewers (in some of which hogs were rooting around) and it is sometimes overpowering.

Jaisalmer

 

 

Jaisalmer

 

Jaisalmer



Jaisalmer

Thereafter, whenever we were walking the streets, I took a scarf with me to block out as much of the smell as I could. The city is in the process of improving the sewers so hopefully this will not be a problem in future. They are also burying the cables which at the moment disfigure the streets.

Jaisalmer
New, and as lovingly decorated as the old.
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

Everywhere we went we saw magnificent carved sandstone buildings - the carving here is immensely delicate and ornate, the best we have seen so far.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
The material for a turban, freshly starched.

 

 

Just outside the gate to the fort, below our balcony, we had watched men stretching out long pieces of colourful cloth and folding them neatly. They were still there when we walked out and our guide told us that these were materials for turbans that the men had starched and left to dry in the sun.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Villagers bring their produce to sell in Jaisalmer.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Wedding announcement.

 

In Jaisalmer where a wedding was taking place a colourful image of Ganesha with relevant names and dates was painted on the outside wall of the home. This remains in place until the next event so there are lots to see, most faded in the sun but some very fresh as this is the wedding season.

The streets are busy. The main mode of goods transport is the camel cart, but motorbikes are favoured for personal use as well as the ubiquitous tuk-tuk and bicycle.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

Like everywhere else in India, young boys played cricket in the streets, only here there was even less space than elsewhere. There seemed no possibility for the batsman to do anything other than to belt the ball straight back at the bowler!

At the end of our walk we made our way outside the city and climbed a hill to the south to watch the sunset - here too, on the waste ground, cricket was being played. It was cool on the hill and, though low cloud on the horizon meant it was not the best sunset, the view was still tremendous.

That evening we had an excellent meal on the rooftop terrace of the Trio restaurant with a fine view of the illuminated fort. Two excellent curries and different varieties of naan bread washed down with beer followed by an exhilarating tuk-tuk ride back to the hotel. Tea on the terrace before bed.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Ornate Hindu Temple.

 

On another day while we were looking around the city our guide took us to his cousin's shop. This is a hazard with guides but I was looking for some things and our guide was not pushy and it was actually a very enjoyable experience.

 

Jaisalmer
Bhang is a derivative of marijuana - on this street the white shop is an authorised outlet.
Jaisalmer

 

 

 

They offered us masala chai which we love and then showed me various garments. After I had bought some things I came to pay and they said that it was traditional to add 11Rp to the bill for Ganesh. A statue of Ganesh sits in a niche in the corner of the shop and this is the temple area. I asked if I could place the money on the shrine and this was fine but I had to observe the rituals. I removed my shoes and then washed my hands - I had to go outside for this where the cousin poured water from a pot over my hands. Then I had to go to the temple area with a clear heart, hands together as for prayer and put the 11Rp beside the statue.

 

The Jain Temples

Jaisalmer
Chandraprabhu

 

The Jain temple complex south west of the palace is famed for its intricate carving. They were built between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries in the lovely local golden sandstone.

Jaisalmer
Inside Rikhabdev.

We visited two of the temples, Chandraprabhu and Rikhabdev. Chandraprabhu is a massive, heavy-looking building with an amazing interior dome carved with male and female figures and the elephant god Ganesh. Next door is Rikhabdev, with beautifully detailed carvings of men and women.

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Inside Rikhabdev.
Jaisalmer

 

Jaisalmer
Inside Rikhabdev.


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Chandraprabhu dome.
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Chandraprabhu dome
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Jaisalmer
Inside Rikhabdev.


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Inside Chandraprabhu.

 

 

It was vey difficult to get a decent photograph inside Chandraprabhu so these really don't do it justice!

 

Havelis - Private Mansions

 

Nathmal-ki Haveli

Jaisalmer

This was the residence of a Prime Minister and is still a private home. There is a little pressure to buy things here.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

It is quite a large building, created by two architect brothers in the nineteenth century. The stunningly carved exterior is almost, but not quite, identical on the left and right of the entrance - the differences reflect the styles of the two brothers.

Inside for a small fee you can be shown upstairs to a room decorated with beautiful paintings.

Jaisalmer

Patwa-Ki Haveli

Jaisalmer

 

Another nineteenth century haveli, this is the most celebrated in Jaisalmer, built by a merchant family trading in brocade and jewellery.

The balconied rooms have beautiful ceilings.

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Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

 

Gadi Sagar Tank

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

 

This reservoir once served the needs of the whole city. It was built in 1367 by Maharaja Gadi SIngh. It is edged with sandstone temples and reached through an impressive gateway said to have been built by a prostitute.

 

Jaisalmer

 

Apparently the Maharaja was intent on destroying the gateway under pressure from the Brahmins. The prostitute hastily incorporated a temple overnight by adding a statue of Krishna, thus ensuring that it could not be torn down. The Maharaja never used this gate to visit the lake, which today is looking very low in water, the result of several poor monsoons.

 

Jaisalmer
Caravanserai

The tank is now fed by the Indira Ghandi canal which also brings catfish! On the edge of the reservoir is a caravanserai for camel drivers on the trade route as they were not allowed inside the city.

Jaisalmer

 

Camel Trek in the Sam Dunes of the Great Thar Desert

Jaisalmer

 

Sound romantic? Well, it was good fun but if you're looking for the peace of the desert it's not to be found here!

Sam dunes
The camels are very docile but rather stubborn!

We had two very sedate camels for the half hour ride to the dunes. They were 9 and 11 years old, they generally live to about 25. This is just their evening job - they do other stuff during the day.

Jaisalmer

The sounds of what seemed to be a party could be heard as we moved along and this wasn't surprising as when we arrived there must have been a couple of hundred locals, mostly families, having picnics and playing, waiting for the sunset. It was a bit overcast so there was not going to be a great sunset and we didn't linger.

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

The most interesting thing I saw was a very industrious dung beetle but no chance of a photograph as I was on the camel at the time.

This is about as far as you can go towards Pakistan - only 75km from the border - before being stopped by the military.

On returning we ate at the Italian restaurant just below our balcony. It has a fine rooftop eating area with great views of the fort.

 

Jaisalmer